Monthly Letter – July 2018

Dear Friends

For many the summer equates to rest and relaxation. A chance to slow down, to ease back on the throttle of their living and to take a break.

We can easily get jaded and tired by the time these summer months begin: and when fatigue rules the roost in our physical frames, then such weariness warps our perspective.

There are often certain tell-tale signs of jaded living. A creeping negativity takes root. An eager, pulsing hopefulness gives way to gloom and fear. Fatalism starts to rear its head. Cynicism starts to mark our outlook. Criticism becomes our basic, default attitude. We start to ‘turn turtle’: instead of our being slow to anger and quick and careful to listen, the pattern is turned upside down – we lose interest in what they are saying, we lose patience with how they’re behaving. God seems somehow that much smaller, and a good deal more remote: while pressures, problems, people – they all seem that much larger, more immediate.

An eclipse of the spirit takes place, as the ‘moon’ which these things represent drifts across our clear sight of the light of the sun, and our world then goes eerily dark. The moon, of course, is in truth wholly dwarfed by the size of the sun: and the problems and pressures and people we face are in just the same way themselves all as nothing compared to the greatness of God: but fatigue tilts the orbit of our living out of line, and the little becomes very quickly so large, and a gloom casts its pall on our souls.

Jaded. Tired. In need of a rest. And so, for many, the summer affords them the chance to take a break.

Some will head off to all sorts of foreign climes, seeking either the sun or the sights of some faraway place (or maybe ideally both): others will stay nearer home (perhaps even at home), and be glad of the chance to hunker down and hide away from the world in which they have been living.

Some will go looking for peace and quiet seclusion: others will seek out activities, challenge, adventure – something, somewhere, that’s completely and utterly different.

We’re all of us different in how we address this issue of fatigue, which seeps its subtly toxic fumes of jaundiced living through our body, mind and soul, and leaves us thereby weary, worn and wholly out of sorts. But all of us, too, well recognize the issue and are looking for refreshment and renewal.

Summer is the season of refreshment. For most of us at least! And one way or another this season of refreshment sends us back into the routines of our daily lives revitalized, re-energised, and raring for the action and the challenges our work entails. The day of that eerie ‘eclipse’ of the soul is then long since forgotten: the ‘moon’ which had clouded our spirits has now shrunk away to the size of a far-away ball. The problems have paled, the pressures have eased, the people are really not bad: and we’re ready to take on the world once again in a confidence borne from the sunshine and rest we’ve enjoyed.

Our perspective’s restored. Our spirit’s renewed. Our energy, our expectancy, our enthusiastic eagerness for all that following Jesus will involve – all that has been restored. Strength: love: passion: hope: and confidence. All restored.

That’s the effect (or at least what we hope’s the effect) of this annual summer season of refreshment.

But would it not be something if our lives and our living had that sort of impact on those we were with day by day? If we, in ourselves, in the manner in which we were living our day by day lives – if we in ourselves were this season of summer to others.

I guess it was that sort of thing to which Paul was alluding when, writing to Philemon his friend, he said that this man had “refreshed the hearts of the saints” (Philemon 7). This humble believer was a one-man summer holiday!

Whoever you were, whenever you met and had time with this man, you came away feeling so entirely and truly refreshed: you came away feeling just the way that you do at the end of a holiday break. Eager, expectant, and all fired up. Ready for every new challenge. Motivated, energized, and confident.

Philemon, it seems, brought to the experience of the people he was with this season of refreshment. In the same sort of way that Jesus Himself always does (only far more so in His case).

And it’s striking to see how the same sort of thing finds expression in many another. As if in a gentle, subliminal way, the Lord through His Word wants to marinate our spirits in a ’season of refreshment’ sort of wine.

Job is surely another such man whose whole living had just that effect. Listen to how the man puts it – “They waited for me as for showers and drank in my words as the spring rain (a different season, I know, but it’s the same idea!). When I smiled at them, they scarcely believed it: the light of my face was precious to them” (Job 29.23f – the whole of the chapter expands on this man’s way of life, and illustrates well just how he ‘refreshed’ all of those he encountered in life).

You were always refreshed after time with this man. And as often as not it was just through all the little things that that refreshment came: some well-chosen words, and the way that those words would be spoken: the warmth of his smile and the look in his eyes. Little things, which somehow brought the light of God Himself to bear upon your heart and made you feel re-energised and strong.

The same, in a rather different way, was also true of Jonathan. What a blessing it would surely have been to have known this guy as your friend! Full of an almost ‘boyish’ sort of fun, and full as well of a faith-fuelled spirit of adventure: but what a friend! Thoughtful, kind, and always so encouraging and warm. Like the time he went out to David in the wilderness: and David, his friend, was way out there in a desert place in every sense of the word. Jaded, tired, despondent: fearing the worst, prepared to give up, beginning to think “what’s the point?”

And at no small risk to himself (and at no small cost, as well, because in many ways this was the moment which cost him the throne) – at no small risk to himself Jonathan went out to the desert of Ziph and “strengthened his hand in God” (1 Sam.23.16ff). Refreshing the heart of this saint.

Again, like Job, it was just through all the little things. Like his taking the trouble to go to his friend. Like the simple fact of a hug and embrace as they greeted one another. Like the comfort of his presence in the face of all the pressures David knew. Like the few choice words of re-assuring hope and warm encouragement. Like the spoken pledge of continuing friendship and love.

To have seen the face of this man at that time would have been for David like seeing the face of God. An instant summer holiday. A season of refreshment from the hand of God, brought to him there in the person of his friend.

What is such a season of refreshment? It’s the same as the ‘times of refreshing’ of which Peter spoke in the early weeks and months of Jesus’ church (Acts 3.19) – those ‘times of refreshing’ when the Spirit of God bathes the people of God with such streams of the grace of the presence of God that the saints are enlivened all over again and emboldened for great deeds of faith: it’s those sort of ‘times of refreshing’ which come to be embodied in, and indeed imparted by, the life and daily living of a follower of Christ.

Oh that our lives and our living might always be such! Great reservoirs of grace which daily pour their cool, fresh waters on the dry, parched lives of those who have been buffeted and bruised, and find themselves now wandering in their own distressing wilderness of Ziph.

How do we ensure this is much more than just the cry within our hearts? How do we become such men and women who refresh the hearts of saints?

It surely has something to do, for a start, with the thrust of Psalm 1, with its focus on the person “whose delight is in the law of the Lord and who meditates on His law day and night.” A round-the-clock engaging with the Word of God, that’s what the psalmist is on about there. That does something to us: and the effect it has is just this – “that person is like a tree planted by streams of water, which yields its fruit in season and whose leaf does not wither – whatever they do prospers” (Ps.1.3).

It surely, as well, has something to do with the work of the Spirit of God in our hearts and our lives. Remember Jesus’ gracious invitation? “’Let anyone who is thirsty (isn’t that wonderful – anyone, no exclusions at all, no qualifications required), let anyone who is thirsty come to Me and drink. Whoever believes in Me, as Scripture has said, rivers of living water will flow from within them.’ By this He meant the Spirit…” (John 7.37-39).

Our hearts becoming reservoirs of Holy Spirit grace, providing for the people whom we meet a constant stream of cool and sparkling water to refresh them as they journey through their wilderness of Ziph.

May we learn thus to live, that in and through the multitude of ‘little things’ which make up all the ‘doings’ of our daily lives, we end up being to others just a walking, talking, living ‘summer holiday’, refreshing the hearts of the saints!

Enjoy your summer!

Yours in the Lord Jesus Christ,

Jeremy Middleton