Monthly Letter – May 2017

Dear Friends

Easter is the pivot of history. The death and resurrection of Jesus changed everything. The rule-book of religion was redundant. Overnight. Over that Saturday night to be precise.

I mean, you can take your old rule-book along to the tomb where they’ve buried the Lord whom you love – and .. well, it suddenly doesn’t help you one small bit. Is your being at the tomb really now a ‘defilement’, since the tomb is the place of the dead? Hardly! It’s life like this world hasn’t witnessed life ever before – it’s life which has just now exploded and filled the whole place. This tomb has become more a ‘womb’!

And the play-it-by-the-rule-book sort of rituals which have marked the former piety of people in their worship of the Lord – those careful, costly God-exalting rituals of anointing by which again the women were expressing their devotion to their Friend, well, they’re suddenly overtaken by events.

They’re living now on the future side of Easter. And there’s now for them, and for us as well, a whole new way of living to be learned.

Jesus is risen. His work is complete. The curtain in the temple’s been torn down. The door of the prison has been blown off its hinges. The future is no longer now the stuff of mere dreams. We’re out at last on the wide open seas of new life.

It’s a bit like that moment in the Tom Hanks movie Castaway when (and this is going to spoil the story a bit, if you’ve not yet seen the film but are planning still to do so! But isn’t that what we all of us are by nature, ‘cast away’ from the Lord?) – it’s a bit like the moment when the guy gets off the island. He’s been stuck there, alone, for more than long enough: and to leave this lonely, isolated, castaway, island life, there’s a great big ‘barrier’ reef  which has to be crossed. With just the right wind, and with a whole load of work, the man with his make-shift and DIY raft finally breaks through the surge of the reef, and the gateway to freedom is there.

That’s the ‘resurrection moment’ in the narrative of Castaway. But it’s not the end of the story, of course! Anything but. There’s an uncharted ocean the guy has then to navigate – and I’m not sure he’d given much thought to that (but I’ll not spoil the story any more)!

In much the same way, the post-resurrection experience of those on-the-spot disciples of Jesus, saw them suddenly bursting right out onto the uncharted waters of a whole new era of grace. Far from being the climax and conclusion of the story, Jesus’ resurrection was actually just the centre-piece and pivot of the narrative: the story was only beginning.

We, too, live now on the ocean side of the Castaway reef, the ‘future’ side of Easter. And the very specific context in which we here are sailing that ocean of grace is this period of ‘post-Bought-it’: and the question we’re facing is – what happens next, now that the building’s been bought?

For that was something of a ‘resurrection’ moment for ourselves, was it not! A mighty demonstration of the power of the living God, helping us see just how very able He is to do so immeasurably more than all we could ever ask or even think. What momentous days, they were!

But now that that ‘reef’ has been crossed, and we’re out on the ‘post-Bought-it’ seas of the freedoms which ownership brings, we’re learning fast the facts of resurrection life: the most basic of which is this – the display by the Lord of such resurrecting power is never where the story ends, but only where, in a very real sense, it finally begins.

So, what, in other words – what has this great display of His grace been all about? Why has the Lord entrusted this building to us? Where do we go now from here? How do we see this building being used? And what may we, therefore, expect?

Here, then, is what we may start to expect – in a very ‘broad-brush-stroke’ account of the burden which lies on my heart.

Stated very simply, Easter was followed, some seven weeks on, by the floodgates of heaven being opened by God in the event we know as Pentecost.

Is it valid to think that a similar sequence of God’s gracious dealings might be our experience too? There’s surely some reason to think so! As I said last month, the backdrop to the purchase of the building was the word the Lord laid firmly on our hearts – that word of extraordinary promise. “’Test Me in this,’ says the Lord Almighty, ‘and see if I will not throw open the floodgates of heaven and pour out so much blessing that you will not have room enough for it..’”

And the fact we were able to purchase the building outright was not so much the floodgates of heaven being opened (though we recognized the hand of God in “the abundance that we have provided” [1 Chron.29.16]), as our rising to God’s challenge to our giving, and our ‘testing’ God in this.

Have we not some cause to expect, therefore, now that the floodgates of heaven will be graciously opened by God in a fresh and abundant outpouring of blessing? Our ‘Easter’ being followed by a ‘Pentecost’ of grace. Isn’t that the tenor of God’s word to us and the pattern of God’s work? And isn’t that the thrust of what we might be praying now as well?

If the ‘floodgates of heaven’ are opened, then it’s streams that we’re likely to see: and that’s what I hope we may find ourselves burdened to pray for. There’s a verse in the book of Micah which puts it well – “In the last days the mountain of the Lord’s temple will be established as chief among the mountains; it will be raised above the hills, and people will stream to it” (Micah 4.1).

People streaming in.

Sunday by Sunday, early in the morning, I stand by the lectern and pray to that end – that the floodgates of heaven will be opened up wide by the Lord as the doors of the building He’s given us here are pulled back, and a great and growing crowd of thirsty people will come streaming in.

To which you maybe say (politely, of course, and under your breath) – dream on! How on earth (you may think) are we ever to see such a ‘stream’ of people crowding in to share with us in our worship? Those days are past now, surely (as the song goes): and in the past are they not now bound to remain?

So – are such streams merely dreams?

Surely not with a God who is able to do so immeasurably more than all we might ask or might think. Surely not with a God who has said that He’d throw open wide the floodgates of heaven.

But how? Well, it’s spring-time now (at least in theory!) and we know how it works in the natural world. You look at the thick layers of snow on the mountains, the huge depths of ice in a glacier, and .. well, we haven’t got equipment which can turn all that to water! We maybe haven’t – but the Lord very definitely has, hasn’t He?

And what’s true in the realm of the glaciers and snow is as true in the realm of the spirit. “He sends His word and melts them; He stirs up His breezes, and the waters flow” (Ps.147.18)

That’s what those dreams of the streams are all made of! The Word of God and the Spirit of God – a mighty combination! No matter how hard are the hearts of the people around us: no matter how cold towards Jesus the culture may seem in these days still to be – when the Lord sends His Word, when the breezes of God’s Holy Spirit at work blow in with His life-giving grace, then a new spring-time season arrives, and the glaciers of cold unbelief start to melt: the waters flow, and the streams of our dreams fill those valleys, which ‘til then have only been full of dry bones.

Dear friends, let’s never forget that we’re post-resurrection people! We’re out now on the ocean side of that reef! The building’s been bought, we’re afloat on the high seas of grace! Let’s pray for that grace from on high whereby, through His Word, the hearts of the cold are all melted: let’s pray that the Lord stirs His breezes again and the wind of the Spirit sees the waters of new life begin to flow: and let’s pray for those streams, for those people streaming in!

Yours with warm expectancy in Christ

Jeremy Middleton